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Ed Marinaro (born March 31, 1950 in New York City) is an American actor and former football player. Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (890x1174, 1108 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. . Jump to: navigation, search March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. . Jump to: navigation, search 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). . New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. . Jump to: navigation, search Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. . United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. .

Marinaro played college football at Cornell University where he set over 16 NCAA records. He was runner up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy in 1971. He went on to play professional football for the Minnesota Vikings, New York Jets, and Seattle Seahawks. He was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1991. Jump to: navigation, search A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. . Jump to: navigation, search For other uses of the name Cornell, see Cornell (disambiguation). . The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced NC-Double-A) is a voluntary and often controversial association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. . There have been several well-known people named Pat Sullivan, including: Pat Sullivan (film producer) Pat Sullivan (football player) Pat Sullivan (software developer, author) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. . The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award, considered the most prestigious award in American college football, is given annually to the top player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). . See also: 1970 in sports, other events of 1971, 1972 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Richard Petty won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Richard Petty Indianapolis 500 - Al Unser, Sr. . Jump to: navigation, search Conference NFC Division North Year Founded 1961 Home Field Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome City Minneapolis, Minnesota Team Colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Mike Tice League Championships (1) NFL Champions: 1969 Conference Championships (4) NFL Western: 1969 NFC: 1973, 1974, 1976 Division Championships (16) NFL. Jump to: navigation, search Conference AFC Division East Year Founded 1960 Home Field Giants Stadium City East Rutherford, New Jersey Team Colors Green and White Head Coach Herman Edwards League Championships (1) AFL Champions & Super Bowl: 1968 (III) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (4) AFL East: 1968, 1969 AFC East. Jump to: navigation, search Conference NFC Division West Year Founded 1976 Home Field Qwest Field City Seattle, Washington Team Colors Seahawks Blue, Seahawks Navy, Seahawks Bright Green Head Coach Mike Holmgren League Championships (0) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (3) AFC West: 1988, 1999 NFC West: 2004 The Seattle Seahawks. The College Football Hall of Fame, located in South Bend, Indiana, United States, is a hall of fame devoted to college football. . See also: 1990 in sports, other events of 1991, 1992 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing Stock car racing: Ernie Irvan won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Dale Earnhardt CART Racing - Michael Andretti won the season championship Indianapolis 500 - Rick Mears Formula One Championship - Ayrton.

After leaving football, Marinaro became an actor. He has been a cast member on a number of television series including The Edge of Night, Laverne & Shirley, Hill Street Blues, and Sisters. The Edge of Night title card from 1960. . This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. . Hill Street Blues was a serial police drama that first aired on NBC in 1981 and ran on primetime into 1987. . Sisters was a television drama which aired on NBC from 1991 to 1996. .

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Ed Marinaro

ed marinaro football statistics

  • 1971 Maxwell Award
  • 2× NFC Champion (1973, 1974)

Ed Marinaro (born March 31, 1950) is a former American Football player and actor. In 1971, he finished as a runner up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy , and from 2010–2011 starred in the football comedy series, Blue Mountain State . He is best known as a regular cast member on Hill Street Blues , playing Officer Joe Coffey for five seasons, 1981–1986.

  • football career
  • acting career
  • personal life
  • see also
  • references
  • external links
Football career

Marinaro played college football at Cornell University , where he set over 16 NCAA records. He was the first running back in NCAA history to run for 4,000 career rushing yards and led the nation in rushing in both 1970 and 1971.

Marinaro was runner-up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy in 1971, the highest finish for an Ivy League player since the league de-emphasized football in the mid-1950s. Princeton 's Dick Kazmaier won the award in 1951 when the Ivy was still considered a major football conference. Marinaro won the 1971 Maxwell Award and the UPI College Football Player of the Year as the top player in college football. He holds two NCAA records: most rushes per game in a season (39.6 in 1971) and career average carries per game (34.0, 1969–71).

While at Cornell, Marinaro was a member of Psi Upsilon and was selected for membership in the Sphinx Head Society . He went on to play professional football for six seasons with the Minnesota Vikings , New York Jets and Seattle Seahawks , appearing in Super Bowl VIII and Super Bowl IX with the Vikings. He scored 13 touchdowns over his career.

Marinaro was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1991.

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Next, Marinaro played college football at Cornell University where he set over 16 NCAA records. He was the first running back in NCAA history to run for 4,000 career rushing yards and led the nation in rushing in both 1970 and 1971.

Marinaro was runner-up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy in 1971, the highest finish for an Ivy League player since the league de-emphasized football in the mid-1950s. Princeton's Dick Kazmaier won the award in 1951 when the Ivy was still considered a major football conference. Marinaro won the 1971 Maxwell Award and the UPI College Football Player of the Year as the top player in college football.

Marinaro still holds two NCAA records: most rushes per game in a season (39.6 in 1971) and in a career (34.0, 1969-71).

While at Cornell, Marinaro was a member of Psi Upsilon and was selected for membership in the Sphinx Head Society.

Marinaro went on to play professional football for six seasons with the Minnesota Vikings, New York Jets and Seattle Seahawks, appearing in Super Bowl VIII and Super Bowl IX with the Vikings. He scored 13 touchdowns over his career.

Marinaro was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1991.

Acting career

After leaving football, Marinaro became an actor. He has been a cast member on a number of television series, including The Edge of Night, Laverne & Shirley, Hill Street Blues and Sisters. He also appeared in the 2006 film Circus Island.

In 2010, Marinaro is scheduled to play the head football coach on Spike TV's new comedy, "Blue Mountain State."

Marinaro currently has a four year old son, Eddie, with fitness expert Tracy York. [ 2 ]

Ed marinaro football - Yahoo Search Results

Yahoo Web Search Ed Marinaro

Ed Marinaro is a former American Football player and actor. In 1971, he finished as a runner up to Pat Sullivan for the Heisman Trophy, and from 2010–2011 starred in the football comedy series, Blue Mountain State. wikipedia.org

  • Born: March 31, 1950 (age 67), New York City
  • Nationality: American
  • Height: 6' 2" (1.88m)
  • Spouse: Tracy York (m. 2001-present)
  • Children: Eddie Marinaro
Ed Marinaro - NNDB

Ed Marinaro. AKA Edward Francis Marinaro. Born: 31-Mar-1950 Birthplace: New York City. Gender: Male Race or Ethnicity: White Sexual orientation: Straight Occupation .

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ED MARINARO RECOUNTS THE LESSONS OF FOOTBALL

ED MARINARO RECOUNTS THE LESSONS OF FOOTBALL
By IRA BERKOW
Published: September 22, 1981

When Ed Marinaro was an all-America tailback at Cornell, the football team ran an I-formation offense that, it was said, was really Marinaro to the right, Marinaro to the left, Marinaro up the middle. With flair. That was on the football field. On campus, Marinaro seemed to drive and park his car in similar fashion - he saw a hole, and he hit it.

He was once asked what kind of car he drove in those days. ''One with a lot of tickets,'' he said with chagrin. By the time he left Cornell in 1972, Marinaro had accumulated 4,175 yards rushing in three varsity years -a college career record at that time -plus $143 in unpaid parking fines.

Marinaro went on to play six unspectacular years in the National Football League - for the Vikings, the Seahawks an d the Jets - and currently is a regular in the cast of the television series ''Hill Street Blues. ''

Meanwhile, those college traffic fines faded from his thought. But in Ithaca, N.Y., the long memory of the law remained active. And when it learned that Marinaro would attend the 10th anniversary reunion this fall of the team that tied Harvard for the Ivy League title - Cornell's only first-place finish in football - it issued a warrant for his arrest.

Upon reading this in a newspaper, Bernard Olin, an 82-year-old Cornell alumnus (class of '24) living in Fairport, N.Y., a suburb of Rochester, immediately wrote out a check for the amount and sent it to the police. ''I resented the unfair aspersions cast upon Ed Marinaro,'' Mr. Olin said. ''The thrills afforded me by Ed Marinaro when he was running touchdowns for Cornell were worth a lot more than $143.'' (Marinaro, appreciative, planned to reimburse him.) Coping With the Veterans

Today Marinaro says that it was just silly college stuff that led him to his traffic problems. It is also likely that being a college football star led Marinaro to believe he held a special place in the world, but that notion was cut short when he entered the pros.

Marinaro was second in the 1971 Heisman Trophy balloting to Pat Sullivan, the Auburn quarterback, and he was taken in the second round of the pro draft by the Vikings. Naturally his new teammates dubbed him Avis.

''The biggest mistake I made was driving into training camp in a new purple Porsche,'' Marinaro said by telephone recently from his home in Beverly Hills.

The Viking camp was in Mankato, Minn. ''This was a team of old, grizzled veterans,'' Marinaro said. ''They hated to see a young guy come in. God, they were tough and mean. And here I come tooling up in this flashy car. Besides that, I had a lot of publicity when I was in college - and, I was an Ivy-Leaguer.

''Rookies in pro football camps take a lot of abuse anyway. Well, one of the first guys I saw was Grady Alderman. He had been the center of the team for about 15 years. He came over and introduced himself. He said, 'A bunch of the guys have a little card game every night on the second floor of the dorm. We want you to join us.'

''I said, 'Sure!' This was a thrill. I mean, I had proba bly sent away for Grady Alderman's autograph when I wa s a kid in Milford, N.J. ''But I wound up getting coffee for everyon e that first week. The next week another rookie did it. But the bad part was when you had a good hand, they'd say, 'Brew some coffee.' I' d say, 'Aw gee, fellas, can't it wait until after the hand?.' No. And I'd throw in my hand, like four aces. Another Bad Parking Spot

''Guys in training camp do things they might not normally do. They are grown men cooped up with a roommate in a college dorm for six weeks. They have to be in bed by 11, and a coach comes around making bed checks with a flashlight.

''One day I go into the trainer's room after practice. I come out, and I can't find my car. So I go down to the police station. I'm filling out papers when someone shouts, 'Is Marinaro there?' They had found the car. It's in the middle of the practice field. I went to get it. The doors were locked, and the keys were gone.

''I left it there. I figured one of the guys would eventually come around with the keys. The next morning I'm dressing in the locker room, and I'm told Coach Grant wants to see me.'' Bud Grant is the Vikings' head coach.

''Grant's outside,'' Marinaro said, ''and there's about a thousand fans in the stands waiting for practice to start. He says, 'What is your car doing in the middle of the practice field? What in the hell were you doing last night?' I tried to explain, but it didn't seem to satisfy him.

''Now I don't know what to do. I go back to the locker room, and I see my keys there. I have to go and, in front of everybody, drive the car off the field in my uniform.'' Football Helped His Acting

Before one of his first pro games, against Pittsburgh, Marinaro listened as the offensive-backfield coach gave a rundown on the Steelers: ''And one thing to remember. Don't get Mean Joe Greene mad. If you do, he might kill somebody.''

''Everyone laughed, except me,'' Marinaro said. ''And whenever Mean Joe Greene tackled me, I jumped to my feet and helped him up.'' In the pros, they'll remember Greene far longer than they will Marinaro, who, in 58 games, rushed for 1,319 yards - a 3.4 yards-percarry average - and scored six touchdowns. But his experiences as a pro football player, Marinaro says, have aided him in his acting career, which he has pursued diligently since he retired durin g training camp in 1978.

''It gave me a little perspective,'' he said. ''Friends of mine audition for a director, and when they come out they're shaking from worry. But the pressure doesn't get to me. I tell them, 'Pressure is when you fumble on the 1-yard line after a long drive and 70,000 fans are booing you and your teammates give you ugly looks.' ''

But that happened rarely at Cornell. His last game, against Penn at Franklin Field in Philadelphia, capped his great college career. On that cool, brittle Saturday afternoon in November, he scored five touchdowns and ran for 230 yards to lead Cornell to victory and clinch a tie for first place in the Ivy League. It was also a day in which a good performance might greatly influence the Heisman judges.

''We were all conscious of it,'' said Clifford Hendry, now a sales executive for Beecham Products in New York. Hendry, the secondstring quarterback, was a roommate of Marinaro. In the Penn game, he replaced the starter, Mark Allen, who was injured in the second period. Until then, Hendry had played only two downs the entire season.

''When I came in,'' Hendry said, ''I hoped Ed wouldn't think, 'Oh, no, Cliff's going to screw things up.' But he gave me confidence. After the game he hugged me, and said he knew I could do it. He tried to kiss me, but our face masks got in the way.''

So after a decade, Ed Marinaro will return to his alma mater. And with his fine paid, he can look forward to being greeted by old friends with warm memories, instead of the local fuzz with waiting handcuffs.

Illustrations: photo of Ed Marinaro photo of Ed Marinaro playing football for Cornell

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