Temperature At Wimbledon - Sports Betting

Gotling.trade

Sports Betting

Temperature At Wimbledon

Category: Other

Description

Wimbledon in meltdown as temperatures soar, Reuters

Wimbledon in meltdown as temperatures soar

LONDON (Reuters) - When tennis fans from Arizona say it is hot at the Wimbledon championships, then it must be.

“It’s hot and I‘m the only guy in jeans,” said Cesar Ponce, 30, from Tucson who with his wife Melissa had queued from about 6 a.m. for four hours to buy ground passes.

Wednesday was the hottest day so far at the grasscourt tournament which started on Monday, with the thermometer hitting just over 34 degrees Celsius (93 Fahrenheit) at 11 a.m., then cooling down marginally in the afternoon, according to Britain’s Met Office.

Australian Bernard Tomic, the 27th seed, needed treatment after toiling under the blazing sun during his second-round match.

“I was very dizzy out there. I didn’t sleep well yesterday and the day before. I was fatigued and starting to get dizzy out there with the heat hitting me,” he told reporters.

Women’s fourth seed Maria Sharapova, however, was unconcerned.

“It’s much much warmer in my hometown in Longboat Key, Florida,” the Russian told reporters.

“Just being a little bit smarter out there is important.”

Toni Nadal, uncle and coach of twice champion Rafa Nadal, said the heat was not a major issue for the players.

“It’s really hot but it’s not a big problem,” Toni Nadal said. “The key is playing tennis and not thinking about it.”

But if the players are not falling over, some spectators are suffering and a ballboy had to be wheeled off Court 17 after collapsing during a match.

The St. John Ambulance charity which handles emergency calls at Wimbledon said it had treated 96 people on Monday and 173 on Tuesday.

Most of those were for complaints of feeling faint or suffering from slight dehydration and headaches, the charity’s press officer Bijal Patel said.

“We are really busy on the ground and they just have to prioritize treating people,” she said.

“There’s been a lot of kind of awareness-raising of what people should be doing but I don’t know if people are going to take that advice,” she added.

To judge from the large number of umbrellas used as shades and people slathering themselves with sunscreen and wearing hats, the message was getting through.

Luke Resch, 22, had managed to make three sailor-style sunhats out of a broadsheet newspaper.

“We used our origami,” he said. “And we got our hats for the price of a paper.”

His red-haired friend Simon Williams gave his backing to the effectiveness of the makeshift headgear.

“I‘m a ginger and I‘m not dead yet so that’s all right,” he said. “I‘m still here, I‘m not a lobster.”

Editing by Ed Osmond

All quotes delayed a minimum of 15 minutes. See here for a complete list of exchanges and delays.

Other articles

What Is The Temperature At Wimbledon?

What Is The Temperature At Wimbledon?

However, having one of sport’s greatest tournaments in the hottest season of the year comes with risks. Because Wimbledon is played outdoors, it’s always vital to keep one eye on the weather conditions.

In 2010, during the U.S Open, Victoria Azarenka collapsed. This was partially due to the extreme heat whilst playing. Whilst Wimbledon doesn’t have the temperature ranges of its fellow tournaments, there have been some surprising statistics that have arisen over the years.

Tennis Temperatures

Whilst the U.S Open will average around 25C, the Australian Open is much tougher, boasting thermometer-busting levels of 46C! The French Open is very similar to Wimbledon, both having an average temperature of around 20-22C.

1993 was Wimbledon’s sunniest year, with over 150 hours of sunshine. However, there is always a spot of rain, with the exception of 1949, where there was sun during the entire tournament. The hottest average temperature was 25.4C back in 1976.

Taking precautions

It’s important for both players and spectators to protect themselves against the extreme temperatures that can arise sometimes.

During the 2013 tournament, 79 fans were treated for heat-related illnesses during the finals. Just before the Gentlemen’s Singles Final between Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic, temperatures hit a staggering high of 49.8C at one point!

The Centre Court is notorious for being quite the suntrap, mainly due to the overhang of the roof. In fact, over 3,000 gallons of water will be used just to maintain the grass during Wimbledon.

In 2011, Murray was advised to drink 50% more water as he faced losing up to four litres of fluids during his matches. Constant fluid replenishment is by far the most effective method of maintaining a player’s stamina. Cooling the body down before a match is also recommended by professionals, along with ice packs being brought to courtside.

During a match, a player risks increasing their core body temperature to 40C, which can have adverse effects on ability.

Martina Hingis talked about extreme conditions during play saying:

It’s the legs that stop functioning. The brain still wants it, you want to run and you want to get to the ball and play, but you feel like your body can’t cope with what your brain tells it to do.”

In higher temperatures, with five-set matches, studies have shown that players’ reactions times slow down by a quarter of a second. This is more than enough to make or break a deciding game unless adequate protection is considered.

Even watching games of this length in direct sunlight is dangerous, with sunstroke and skin damage being a common occurrence. Spectators should be well stocked with water, along with proper protection for their eyes and head.

The forecast for Wimbledon can be found closer to the time at the MET Office website, and if you’re thinking about attending then call us today to discuss your tickets and choose your seats!

About Us

WimbledonDebentureHolders.com is a specialist boutique website set up in 2006 by Wimbledon debenture holders for debenture holders and international tennis fans.

Contact Us

Although Wimbledon tickets are usually available in pairs or groups of pairs we do have single tickets available - please get in touch for further information.

Temperatures soar, set record for hottest day in Wimbledon history

Ball boy collapses amid record Wimbledon heat Is this heaven? No, it’s a Waffle House Wyshynski: Bring back the glow puck; no, I'm serious Myles Garrett provides hope amid another trying season for Browns From Italy to Oregon: A visual journey inside the Air Jordan XXXII

LONDON -- The heat at Wimbledon on Wednesday caused a ball boy to collapse, a player to feel "dizzy" and thermometers to rise to record levels for the tournament.

Players dismiss notion of men's heat rule at Wimbledon

Soaring temperatures dominated conversation for many on day two at Wimbledon but the players are taking them in their stride.

In the bright sunshine in southwest Wimbledon, temperatures reached 35.7 degrees Celsius (96.26 degrees Fahrenheit), according the Met Office -- the highest recorded during the two-week tournament that is better known for persistent rain.

While players mostly coped well with the conditions, a ball boy collapsed during a match on one of the outside courts and needed medical treatment before being taken away on a stretcher. Organizers said he recovered quickly and was doing well.

"It was a very scary situation," said John Isner, who was playing Matthew Ebden on Court 17 when the incident happened.

"I have heard that he's doing much better, which is great," the American said after winning in straight sets. "He just needs to rest up."

So does Bernard Tomic, who needed treatment on court during his victory over Pierre-Hugues Herbert of France after getting dizzy in the heat. The Australian said he's had trouble sleeping all week because of the hot weather.

"I was fatigued and starting to get dizzy out there with the heat hitting me," Tomic said. "It was tough, so I had to slow things down. I had to catch my breath. . It was not that easy, that situation for me in the second. I was feeling bad. Hopefully I can get a good night's sleep in tonight."

He'll need it before his next match against Novak Djokovic, who said he was happy to wrap up his win against Jarkko Nieminen of Finland quickly on Centre Court so he could get out of the sun.

"On this warm day, it's good to spend a little bit less time (playing) than maybe what is possible," Djokovic said.

While players used towels wrapped around ice to cool down during changeovers, Tommy Haas took it a step further and just removed his shirt in an effort to beat the heat. Ian Walton/Getty Images

Organizers kept the retractable roof over Centre Court closed in the morning to keep out the heat, then had it partially covering the spectators behind the baselines to give them shade. Among those sitting in the sun, hundreds of handheld fans flapped like butterfly wings in the stands.

Players used towels wrapped around ice to cool down during changeovers, while on Henman Hill -- where fans often brave the rain as they gather outdoors to watch the matches on a big screen -- umbrellas once again dotted the green slope. This time, though, they were used as makeshift parasols to shield fans from the sun.

Medical officials said dozens of fans were treated with heat-related illnesses, but no major incidents were reported.

Many of the players, though, said the heat wasn't a big deal.

"It wasn't -- I don't want to call it overrated, because it was very hot out there -- but it wasn't crazy bad," Isner said. "There were a lot of clouds in the sky, which helped I think a lot."

Like Isner, Maria Sharapova trains in Florida and said she's used to hotter temperatures.

"It's much warmer in my hometown of Long Boat Key, Florida," the fourth-seeded Russian said after beating Richel Hogenkamp of the Netherlands in straight sets. "I think I've trained quite long in the heat over there. . You want to make the points quicker than normal because of the heat, just being a little bit smarter out there is the most important."

Sponsored Headlines ABOUT COOKIES

We use cookies to offer an improved online experience. By clicking "OK" without changing your settings you are giving your consent to receive cookies.

Andy Murray beats Mikhail Kukushkin at Wimbledon in 31C heat on Centre Court, Daily Mail Online

Brilliant Brits sizzle in the sun: Murray and three other stars storm to victory as temperatures hit 110F (but at least Kim stays cool)

By Inderdeep Bains and Claire Duffin For The Daily Mail 12:08 BST 30 Jun 2015, updated 12:14 BST 01 Jul 2015

  • Almost 10,000 people braved the queue to get tickets for day two of Wimbledon at the All England Lawn Tennis Club
  • Heatwave means temperatures set to hit a high of 90F today and organisers are telling fans to drink plenty of water

As Wimbledon’s Centre court baked in 43C (110F) heat yesterday, many will have feared the stars of British tennis were at risk of wilting.

Instead they simply sizzled, scoring four victories on the hottest day of the year so far.

Andy Murray won his opening match against Kazakh Mikhail Kukushkin in straight sets, while British women’s number one Heather Watson triumphed over French opponent Caroline Garcia.

Meanwhile Slovenian-born British number two Aljaz Bedene and number-four James Ward won their opening matches, meaning there are now five Britons in the second round following Liam Broady’s victory on Monday.

It was best day for British tennis since 2006, when we had four men in the second round.

Team Murray was well prepared for the almost unbearable conditions during his afternoon fixture on Centre Court.

He kept a cool head in a baseball cap, while his wife Kim whipped out a fan from her £500 designer handbag and basked in the sun in a £60 mini-dress from high street store Zara.

Related Articles

Meanwhile Murray’s pregnant coach Amelie Mauresmo kept things more simple, arming herself with a scrunchie to tie up her hair.

After the match, the 28-year-old world number three said: ‘I haven’t played loads of matches here when it has been as hot as that.

‘I was told on court when I was playing it was 41 degrees . so I was glad to get off. Ideally you don’t want to be playing extremely long matches in those conditions.’

Murray was in excellent form after winning his fourth title at the Queen's club last week and he began as he meant to carry on - taking the first set 6-4.

But he admitted that Kukushkin had made him work for his victory, telling the BBC: 'It was a tough match. I made it hard for myself at the end of the second set. He started playing some very aggressive tennis and hit the ball very well down the line and hit it so low to the net that it was difficult to do much with the ball.

'I felt like I was doing a lot of defending out there and glad a managed to get through on a hot day against a tough opponent.' He made it very uncomfortable for me out there, so credit to him, but I'm glad to get it done in three sets.'

Celebrities including David Beckham, Tess Daly, Vernon Kay, England Manager Roy Hodgson and Denise Van Outen all turned out to support the British hopeful.

However, 23-year-old Miss Watson had a more bad-tempered match and was docked a point for two code violations after she swore and threw her racquet to the ground in frustration. She later apologised for her behaviour in a Press conference. But her mother Michelle said she would not be getting a telling off at home. ‘It’s unlike her to do something like that, she’s an adult now so I can’t tell her anything,’ she sai

Steal Kim's Centre Court style in a crochet dress from Zara

Zara crochet cape sleeve dress Now reduced to £39.99!

It's only day two of Wimbledon and already we're hooked. The sun is shining, the Pimm's is flowing and Kim Murray has arrived to cheer on husband Andy in his first match of this year's tournament. And of course she's looking as lovely as ever!

Between that swoon-worthy Jenny Packham wedding gown and the traditional Wimbledon dress code, the new Mrs. Murray must be used to wearing white by now. We love the crochet texture and cape style sleeves of the dress she sported today, which is from none other than Zara.

And if that wasn't enough good news for one day it's even reduced in the sale! Click the link (right) to buy it now.

When teamed with some tan lace up sandals from Topshop and a raindrop print bag by Aspinal (hopefully that's the only type of rain on Centre Court today!), Kim well and truly won us over in this outfit.

No doubt this bargain of a dress will sell out soon, so if you can't see your size then look no further than the edit below to copy Kim. From Topshop to Temperley London, we've got all budgets covered!

Topshop crochet shift dress (now reduced to £30)

Temperley London crochet knit mini dress at Net-a-Porter (now reduced to £447.50)

Aspinal Marylebone raindrop print bag (now reduced to £497.50)

Asos crochet dress with waist tie

Topshop Nugget ghillie bronze heel sandals

River Island crochet lace T-shirt dress

Mrs Watson was probably just thrilled that her daughter won with her in the stands.

In previous years Miss Watson has banned her parents from attending her matches due to her suspicion that they will jinx her, and cause her to lose, although she has said they are welcome this year.

Elsewhere there were plenty of losers at the All England Club.

Around 10,000 people stood in sweltering temperatures to get tickets to see Murray launch his campaign on centre court.

But, because of the boiling weather, organisers were forced to reduce capacity by 5,000, meaning disappointed fans who had queued for tickets at the gate since the early hours were turned away.

All tickets to the grounds had been sold and the queues closed by 6.53am yesterday compared with 8.02am on the opening day of the tournament.

Richard Lewis, chief executive of the All England Club, said he hoped the measure would help visitors access the water fountains and limited shaded areas more easily.

One of the things we’re doing is slightly reducing the initial capacity, just to see how it goes and there are no unforeseen problems,’ he explained. Mr Lewis added that the situation would be reviewed and more people could be let in if ‘everything’s going well’.

Initially Wimbledon's official Twitter account tweeted at 7.52am this morning to say the queue was at capacity, telling fans they were likely to have to wait 'many hours'.

They said: '#theQueue is at capacity with fans likely to wait many hours. AELTC advises those intending to queue not to travel to #Wimbledon at present

It was probably just as well they did restrict access to the grounds because temperatures soared as high as 30C (86F) off-court.

Visitors were forced to stand in long queues for water fountains or fork out £2.50 for a small bottle.

On court, spectators were forced to use umbrellas, fans and wet towels to keep cool because they are not allowed to get up from their seats until there is a break in the match.

And the Wimbledon pharmacy said it had to restock its shelves constantly after selling vast quantities of sun cream, antihistamines and paracetamol for headaches.

Forecasters have predicted an even hotter 35C (95F) today which could see Centre Court reach almost 49C (120F).

Earlier today, bookmaker William Hill offered just 5/1 odds that for the first time in the tournament's history, the men's play will be suspended because of the heat.

Among those inside early in the day was England football manager Roy Hodgson, who will be watching the action from the Royal Box.

G4S security staff at gate 5 confiscated 30 selfie sticks yesterday, while Gate 4 confiscated pepper spray from a woman this morning.

Outside, those waiting in a queue to get in the queue for tickets tried to keep in the shade and cool themselves down with water.

A woman at the gate said people got so hot yesterday on Murray Mound that they were fainting and had to be attended by St John Ambulance staff.

Andy Smith, 64, an accountant from Cambridge, said he had been in the queue for the tickets queue since around 6am.

'We're here to see whatever we can sit in comfort and see,' Mr Smith said. 'I've been coming to Wimbledon for about 50 years, I used to go to school in the area and would come to watch the tennis after classes.

'I'm hopeful that Andy Murray can win again but I'm not over-optimistic. He is very well-prepared but Djokovic is there, he is the man who is going to stop him.'

Today's heatwave made this year's Wimbledon one of the hottest ever - the previous record temperature at the tennis tournament was on June 26, 1976 when the mercury hit 34.6C (94F).

The tennis action on Centre Court kicked off yesterday with defending champion Novak Djokovic's first round match, while 2013 champion Murray stormed home to victory against Kukushkin.

However, neither of the tennis aces were able to call on Wimbledon's 'heat rule', which allows for a ten-minute break between the second and third sets – because it only applies to women.

William Hill said it is odds on at 4/5 that the hottest ever Wimbledon temperature will be beaten and 10/1 that a Men's break is introduced this year.

'The price of all play being suspended due to excessive temperatures has collapsed from 100/1 to 5/1 and stats say there is a real chance of the unthinkable happening,' said William Hill spokesman Rupert Adams before today's matches.

And there was no relief for the spectators sat in Centre Court, as Wimbledon's retractable roof was not deployed to provide shade from the searing heat.

Peter McFerran, 71, and his wife Sally, 61, from Colchester in Essex, said they had come to Wimbledon ready for the heatwave because Mr McFerran is 'particularly susceptible' to the heat.

Mrs McFerran said: 'It's about being prepared - we have got water, hats and sun cream.

'Ideally you want it perhaps a few degrees cooler but we are very lucky and have tickets to Centre Court in a shady part of the court.

'You want to be somewhere in the mid-20s.'

Nursing student Gemma Williams, 21, and her mother Joy Kenrick, 47, a nurse, from Crawley in West Sussex, were at the All England Club on a ground pass.

Ms Williams said: 'It is extremely hot, it's a bit too much. You can't sit and watch, at least not for too long, you have to move around a lot.

'We brought water, high factor sun cream and an umbrella because we are hoping to watch Andy Murray on Murray Mount and there is nowhere to hide there.'

But Matthew Lechtzier, 59, a Canadian living in Little Venice, west London, who works in the natural resources sector, said he was 'loving' the sunshine.

'I've lived in Britain for 30 years now and there is a certain point in the middle where no-one is complaining,' he said.

'But if it goes just a bit too hot or cold, people complain about it.'

A spokesman for the All England Club had advised visitors to 'drink plenty of water, wear a hat and apply sunscreen.'

Spectators are expected to consume more than 142,000 punnets of strawberries during the tournament, while the players are predicted to eat 12,000 bananas between them.

Officials predict that 10,000 official Wimbledon umbrellas will be bought from the ground, while fans will also snap up a staggering 25,000 championship towels and 7,000 cans of souvenir tennis balls.

Wimbledon fever will also see sales of strawberries rise 11 per cent year on year this week, while sales of cream are already up nine per cent compared to last week.

Sales of Pimm's are also up 25 per cent at Waitrose, compared to the previous week while the Heston from Waitrose Fruit Cup – an Earl Grey and Lemon Gin based spirit with aromas of fruity blackcurrant, fragrant elderflower and citrusy bergamot –has seen a sales increase of 700 per cent.

Meanwhile, English wines are up 107 per cent at the upmarket supermarket, and sales of English rosé wines have increased 130 per cent.

Amy Lance, of Waitrose, said: 'Strawberries and cream go hand in hand with Wimbledon and it's our busiest time of year for these quintessentially British food heroes.

'Thanks to the hot weather we're set to see at SW19 this week, we're expecting this trend to continue, with customers making the most of the sunshine, stocking up on British berries, cream, Pimm's and English wine.'

© Sports Betting 2018